Google rebrands for the mobile world with colorful new logo

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Google has rebranded, unveiling a more colorful logo that changes depending on whether a consumer is using desktop, voice or mobile search

Google has rebranded, unveiling a more colorful logo that changes depending on whether a consumer is using desktop, voice or mobile search

The primary logo still reads "Google" in multicolored letters, but has changed to a simpler, sans-serif custom font on desktop search. 

The aesthetic is noticeably childlike, possibly in reference to Google's new parent company, Alphabet. The holding page for Alphabet features alphabet blocks.

As well as replacing the main search engine logo, Google has scrapped the blue, lower-case "g" for mobile and replaced it with a more colorful version. There's also a matching mic icon for voice queries.

According to a post by Google VP for product management Tamar Yahoshua and director of user experience Bobby Nath the idea is to better signal "how Google is working for you" across difference screens and experiences.

The pair wrote: "We think we’ve taken the best of Google (simple, uncluttered, colorful, friendly), and recast it not just for the Google of today, but for the Google of the future."

The new logos will appear on search, maps, Gmail and Chrome, among other locations. Search users keen to see the new logo can already watch it update itself here.

An accompanying ad highlights Google's major changes over the years, showing how far it's come from simply being a set of blue links on a blank page.

In an essay, Google's UX design lead Alex Cook, creative lead Jonathan Jarvis and design manager Alex Lee outlined the logic behind the new design. 

The rebrand is intended for a world where users might be accessing Google's services on a host of devices like smartwatches and other small, smart devices.

The designers wrote: "Users now engage with Google using a constellation of devices, and our brand should express the same simplicity and delight they expect from our homepage, while fully embracing the opportunities offered by each new device and surface."

It appears that some of Google's less loved products will get a rebrand too.


This article first appeared on marketingmagazine.co.uk.