Deutsch, Joan take Booking.com U.S. creative duties from Wieden+Kennedy

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W+K and travel site part ways in the U.S., but the independent agency will still service the account overseas.

Booking.com has tapped Deutsch and Joan Creative to share its U.S. creative account, replacing Wieden+Kennedy, the company confirmed. "Booking.com is now working with Deutsch and Joan Creative as part of a shift in working with multiple creative partners," said Joseph Moscone, senior manager for public relations at the company. "We continue to work with W+K in other markets."

Last Friday, two new 30-second spots from Deutsch were quietly posted on Booking.com’s YouTube channel. They mark the beginning of the "Nothing Is More Important" campaign, which features people who desperately need to take a vacation.

The spots begin running on network and cable TV this week, and more spots in the campaign will roll out throughout the year.

In October, Campaign US reported that Booking.com was testing work from Deutsch against work from W+K. Both agencies declined to comment on the details of the account move.

The Netherlands-based Booking.com broke into the U.S. market in 2013 with work from Wieden+Kennedy Amsterdam. Since then the agency has continued to work with Booking.com in the European market, and W+K Tokyo has created work for the Japanese market. Those relationships appear to be intact and likely to continue.

Booking.com is owned by Priceline, the travel-bidding site that has long run ads featuring William Shatner. The initial 2013 U.S. campaign for Booking.com had a budget of more than $35 million. By the next year, it had grown to more than $60 million, and $100 million in 2015. Booking.com spent nearly $150 million on U.S. advertising in the first three quarters of 2016, according to Kantar Media.

Deutsch is part of IPG, and Joan Creative is a independent agency in New York City.

Correction: An earlier version of this article stated that Booking.com had named Deutsch its U.S. creative agency of record.