In brief: Stunning Facebook ad format; is Apple building a car?

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In other news: Netflix launches streaming in Cuba ... KFC goes upscale in Australia ... Are ECDs an endangered species? ... Valentine's bouquet from the UK

From the Campaign family:

Love, lust and commercial messages. (Campaign UK) Not expecting many heart-felt missives this Valentine's Day? Don't worry, brands still love you. Campaign has sorted the freshest picks from this year's bunch of ads.

Should agencies do away with ECDs? (Campaign UK) M&C Saatchi has cut Elspeth Lynn, its executive creative director. But are some of her peers shuffling uncomfortably in their seats? After all, if one of Britain’s biggest agencies feels it can get along fine without somebody in overall creative command, what chance is there that others will think likewise? UK ad execs weigh in.

Extra-fancy KFC in Oz. (Campaign Asia-Pacific) KFC has opened a "grown-up" concept store in Sydney, featuring warm wood highlights and a custom menu. Clair van Veen, GM of DesignWorks Sydney, which drove the design concept, said the intent was to combine KFC's core brand values with a more modern urban experience.

From around the web:

Facebook bewitches with cinemagraphic ad format. Facebook, along with its Instagram network, wants more brands to try the half-video, half-photograph style, according to digital marketing insiders. "You're going to start seeing a ton of these on Facebook," said one advertising executive who has seen a guide produced by Facebook for marketers called "Hacking Facebook Autoplay."

Will Apple enter the auto business? Business Insider reports it received an email from an employee at Apple about "vehicle development" at the company. This person said Tesla employees were "jumping ship" to work at Apple. "Apple's latest project is too exciting to pass up," the person said. "I think it will change the landscape and give Tesla a run for its money."

Netflix launches streaming in Cuba. Netflix announced Tuesday that it will begin offering its streaming services in Cuba to anyone with an Internet connection and "access to international payment methods" like debit or credit cards. Streaming starts at $7.99.

Online advertising's piracy problem. Marketers frequently find their ads alongside unlicensed content from major content owners, or on sites promoting counterfeit goods. Now, the Trustworthy Accountability Group, an ad industry self-regulatory body, plans to fix that problem with a new program designed to identify high-risk websites and ensure marketers’ ads aren’t placed on them.

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