In brief: Gillette benefits from #DeflateGate tie-in, car dealers to boost digital ad spend

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In other news: Electric-car advertising gets jumpstart ... Mobile app developers do programmatic ... No British chocolate for you! ... New Navy ad campaign ... How Abercrombie lost its teen touch ... Joe Arpaio hawks Super Bowl ... Yahoo to sell Alibaba stake.

Gillette gains from #DeflateGate exposure. The scandal over underinflated footballs may be a headache for the New England Patriots but a windfall for top sponsor Gillette. ESPN explains how Gillette received almost $4 million in equivalent advertising thanks to a news conference backdrop featured behind both Patriots coach Bill Belichick and quarterback Tom Brady as they discussed why the footballs were inflated to levels below league standards.

Is 2015 the year of electric-car advertising? BMW's Super Bowl ad for its i3 electric vehicle is just the beginning. The BMW blog, of all places offers shout-outs to pending spending by Tesla Motors and Chevy.

Most mobile app developers sell programmatically. Mobile ad firm Millennial Media said 69% of developers make at least a portion of their inventory available for programmatic buying. Forty-six percent sell up to half their inventory via programmatic, while 15% sell more than 75% of their impressions via automation.

Car dealers rev up digital ad spend. Digital ad spending by dealers will increase 25% this year, according to a recent forecast by market watchers Borrell Associates.

Hershey's blocks British chocolate. After a settlement with Hershey's, Let’s Buy British Imports (L.B.B.) agreed to stop importing all Cadbury’s chocolate made overseas. L.B.B. also agreed to cease bringing over UK KitKat bars; Toffee Crisps (too similar to Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups); Yorkie chocolate bars, which infringe on the York peppermint patty; and Maltesers.

Navy launches ad campaign. The new "Pin Map" spot by Warren, Mich.-based Campbell-Ewald debuted Friday night on ESPN’s X-Games. It shows sailors performing a range of tasks to include detecting IEDs with ground robots, climbing snow-covered mountains with rifles, operating rigid-inflatable boats at sea, and flying carrier-launched aircraft in formation.

Abercrombie: A brand for old men? Bloomberg Businessweek takes Abercrombie & Fitch to task for losing sight of teen trends. The article singles out newly ex-CEO Michael Jeffries, the 70-year-old micromanager of the brand, which critics say has excluded fresh ideas as well as consumers who come in different shapes and colors.

Sheriff Joe Arpaio takes Times Square for Super Bowl. New York seems an unlikely constituency, but the controversial Arizona sheriff has been raised 120 feet high to welcome Super Bowl crowds to his state. (No tax dollars were spent in the erection; a friend of Arpaio's who owns Branded Cities Network picked up the tab.)

Yahoo to sell stake in Alibaba. Yahoo had a 23% stake in Alibaba before its IPO. After the IPO, Yahoo kept 383 million Alibaba shares for a 15% stake in the company. Now, Yahoo will deploy its cash for better ROI.

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